Unique Wedding Venues That INSPIRE

You’re engaged and one of your first steps in planning a wedding is selecting a venue for the celebration. Whether you are interested in an indoor or outdoor location, we recommend that you check out these five unique locations for your celebration.

Farm 12, Puyallup

The estate Farm 12 has a variety of options for the special day from rustic to elegant. You can choose from a variety of their indoor or outdoor spaces. They also offer in-house catering and bar services to provide delicious cuisine and cocktails throughout your event.
farm12.org/events

Indian Summer Golf and Country Club, Lacey

Picture your dream ceremony on the beautifully landscaped courtyard, under the watchful eye of towering oak trees while guests gaze over the magnificent wetlands. Indian Summer’s natural setting makes for an amazing backdrop for breathtaking wedding pictures. The intricately landscaped gardens and the charm of the entrance pond to the Clubhouse make a unique setting for the bride and groom’s departure before being whisked away to the honeymoon.
indiansummergolf.com/weddings

Lakewold Gardens, Lakewood

Lakewold Gardens is a lovely 10-acre historic garden estate that features formal and natural settings. Nestled amidst the lush English-inspired gardens is the Georgian-style mansion which overlooks Gravelly Lake. This historic and unique property is an elegant setting for any wedding ceremony and reception. Lakewold Gardens provides a beautiful backdrop for your wedding photos that will continue the memory of your special day for years to come. Discover why they are one of the premier wedding venues in the South Sound.
lakewoldgardens.org/weddings

Press Room, Tacoma

Let a piece of history elevate your guests’ wedding experience. This historic space housed the printing presses for the Tacoma Daily Ledger and Tacoma News Tribune from the early part of the 20th century. This newly reclaimed “urban rustic masterpiece” has been lovingly restored with unmatched craftsmanship and offers a variety of wedding packages. The Press Room is Tacoma’s newest wedding and event space.
pressroomevents.com

Washington State History Museum, Tacoma

Bold architecture, stunning views, and a convenient downtown location make the Washington State History Museum an ideal wedding venue. Located in historic downtown Tacoma, the museum offers grand indoor and outdoor spaces for both your ceremony and reception, private access to their current exhibitions, and beautiful views of the city skyline, Thea Foss waterway, and Mount Rainier.
washingtonhistory.org

Washington State Historical Society’s activities for all ages to participate in Black History Month, online and in-person

Washington State Historical Society’s activities for all ages to participate in Black History Month, online and in-person

Tacoma, WA – Black History Month is an opportunity to explore the achievements and contributions of Black Americans in our past and honor those in our present. You can explore stories and make connections through online and in-person activities with the Washington State Historical Society (WSHS), including:

·         Join in a special event at MOHAI on February 19: “The Green Book – More than a Guide.” The Negro Motorist Green Book was hailed as the “bible of Black travel.” First published in 1936, the guide identified establishments deemed friendly, safe, and willing to serve Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow segregation and “sundown towns.” This event applies a contemporary lens to segregation, Black migration, and the rise of leisure travel through art, presentations and conversation. Presented by The Black Heritage Society of Washington State, Washington State Historical Society, Black & Tan Hall, Bonnie Hopper-Artist, and Chris Hopper-Producer. Included with admission to MOHAI.

·         See a FREE online exhibition and try your hand at a guided art activity. Take a look through Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Visits Seattle on the WSHS website. Learn about Dr. King’s visit to Washington State in 1961 as well as civil rights history in Tacoma. Click on “Art Activity with Valencia Carroll” and her video will guide you through how to make your own Right to Dream Star using a downloadable template and materials from around the house.

·         Stroll over to the Bush Family monument on the Capitol Campus. Unveiled in November, 2021, this new monument honors Black pioneer George Bush and his family, who were among the first non-Native settlers in the Washington Territory. George and Isabella’s son William Owen Bush served in the inaugural Washington State Legislature and helped to found the school that became Washington State University. See the monument and the Bush Butternut Tree in Olympia, and read more about the Bush family on the WSHS website: www.washingtonhistory.org/across-washington/washington-black-history-project.

·         Try a civil rights activity for kids at the History Museum. Review a self-guided  Civil Rights Activity for Kids and visit the Washington State History Museum to find answers in the exhibition Washington: My Home. This activity sheet is available at museum admissions.

·         Read about Nettie Craig Asberry, a civil rights activist and suffragist who lived in Tacoma.
Among other accomplishments, Asberry became president of the Washington State Federation of Colored Women, and was a founder of the Tacoma chapter of the NAACP. Download the article (free) from the WSHS website: www.washingtonhistory.org/columbia-magazine.

·         Next month – Go deep into The Negro Motorist Green Book starting March 19 when the Washington State History Museum opens the immersive exhibition, created by the Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and curated by Candacy Taylor, a leading Green Book scholar and award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian. This multimedia experience shares the national guide’s rich history through photographs, art installations, interactives, historic objects, and recordings from travelers and Green Book business owners.  It also focuses on the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses and the rise of the Black leisure class. Details at www.washingtonhistory.org/exhibits. In advance of seeing the exhibition, you can explore SITES online Green Book experiences for free! Details:  https://negromotoristgreenbook.si.edu/index.html  The exhibition was based on Candacy Taylor’s book, Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America, available at the Tacoma Library.

Black History Month has been officially recognized since 1976, yet its roots date to 1915 when noted scholar and historian Carter G. Woodson participated in events marking the 50th anniversary of emancipation in Illinois. He was one among over ten thousand visitors who lined up to view exhibitions featuring notable accomplishments of Black Americans since the destruction of slavery. Motivated to highlight the Black community’s ongoing contributions and history, Woodson began to publish the Journal of Negro History in 1916, and collaborated with other organizations including his fraternity Omega Psi Phi to create a week formally recognizing Black achievements. They launched Negro History Week in February, 1926. Nurtured by Woodson’s organization, colleagues, and Black college students and communities, the annual one-week event grew and by the 1960s, the longer Black History Month had begun to replace Negro History Week. In 1976 the change became official. Each year there is a theme; this year, it is Black Health and Wellness. Black History Month is an opportunity to explore how history connects us all.

The Negro Motorist Green Book

What comes to mind when you hear “road trip”? Joyfully cruising down a highway flanked by incredible scenery, stopping to eat or check into a hotel whenever and wherever you like, discovering hidden gems along the way? You can explore some significant aspects of American travel history through The Negro Motorist Green Book at the Washington State History Museum this spring. 

When the first Green Book was published in 1936, the American road was a metaphor for freedom. Yet, in 20th century America, this same road was a dangerous place for Black citizens. The land was divided by segregation—through policy or through custom. If you were Black, the prejudice was severe: a systematic effort to deny access to your basic human rights. And yet, African Americans created destinations and strategies that affirmed their humanity, and took to the roads with ingenuity, with community, and with the help of a Harlem postman named Victor Green.

“The Green Book” travel guide was created by Victor Green to provide African American travelers with critical information on restaurants, gas stations, stores, accommodations, and other businesses that welcomed Black travelers during the era of Jim Crow and “sundown towns.” This multimedia experience highlighting the national guide’s rich history was created by the Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service and curated by Candacy Taylor, a leading Green Book scholar and award-winning author, photographer, and documentarian.

Museum visitors will be transported to a time when, as a Black person, it took bravery and a Green Book to travel safely. It’s a dynamic experience shared through photographs, art installations, interactives, historic objects, and oral histories from travelers and Green Book business owners.  It also focuses on the vibrant parallel world of African American businesses, the rise of the Black leisure class, and how The Green Book facilitated the second wave of the Great Migration. 

Motor over to Tacoma to explore the Green Book!

Washington State History Museum
washingtonhistory.org

IN THE SPIRIT Festival This Saturday

The summer is winding down, but there are still plenty of incredible festivals to be enjoyed before fall arrives! This week, we are looking towards the annual IN THE SPIRIT Arts Market and Northwest Native Festival. The festival will be held in person on Saturday, August 7, from 10:00 AM–5:00 PM in the Tacoma Museum District. This beloved summer tradition celebrates the diverse Native cultures of our region and is hosted by the Washington State History MuseumTacoma Art Museum, and Museum of Glass. The indoor/outdoor event is free and open to the public, including free admission to all three museums.

IN THE SPIRIT festival guests can see exhibitions featuring Native artists in the museums; talk with artist vendors and shop for original art, jewelry, textiles, and other hand-crafted products; participate in art-making activities at all three museums; watch artists work in the Hot Shop at MOG; and enjoy cultural musicians and dancers in the outdoor amphitheater at the History Museum. Food and beverages will be available for purchase at the TAM Cafe, and the Price Family (Navajo/Port Gamble S’Klallam) will sell their famous fry bread tacos at the History Museum.

Indigenous dance, music, and artist demonstrations are a festival highlight. The Alaska Kuteeyaa Dancers (Haida and Tlingit) have participated every year since IN THE SPIRIT began 16 years ago (with the exception of 2020 due to the pandemic). Returning favorites also include musician Vince Redhouse (Navajo) on Navajo flute and Rona Yellow Robe (Chippewa Cree Tribe of Rocky Boy, Montana), an award-winning flute player and vocalist. Artist Raya Friday (Lummi Nation) will be on deck in MOG’s Hot Shop, creating with molten glass. ”I’d like to give a big hysh’qe to the big three museums of Tacoma – MOG TAM, WSHM – for carving a space and amplifying the voices of Indigenous artists like myself. Thank you for the opportunity,” Friday shared.

“The museums have been working with Native artists, curators, and community members through the IN THE SPIRIT Advisory Committee to develop a gathering where our visitors and artists can safely reconnect and celebrate in person,” said Molly Wilmoth, lead program manager at the Washington State Historical Society. “We are grateful for all of the talented artists and vendors who are participating both in-person and virtually. Along with the outdoor arts market and cultural performances, we welcome guests to view the exhibitions in the museums, including the 16th annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts exhibition at the History Museum. Visitors can vote in the gallery for the coveted People’s Choice awards.”

“Last year, the IN THE SPIRIT festival went fully online and was extended for a month-long period,” added Amelia Layton, public programs manager at Tacoma Art Museum. “We’re thrilled to be back in person this year to support Native artists. We’re also continuing with some online programming. The August 7 in-person festival is accompanied by an online arts market and several virtual programs that run July 30 through September 3, so we can provide even greater access to the outstanding Native artists of our region.”

Be sure to mark your calendars for the annual festival this Saturday!

In the Spirit

What is happening in the Indigenous art world in our region? Find out at the 13th annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, where you can see 29 works from 21 Native artists. The exhibition opens Saturday, June 30 at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma and will be on view through Sunday, August 12. There will be three opportunities for visitors to meet some of the artists as well: the awards ceremony on July 1, 3:00 PM; gallery talks on Third Thursday evening July 19, 5:30 PM; and the Northwest Native Festival on August 11, 12:00-7:00 PM.

IN THE SPIRIT connects the Washington State Historical Society’s (WSHS) Native collections with the vibrant contemporary arts scene. Visitors will see mixed media, paintings, beadwork, textiles, sculpture, carving, and basketry. Many of the artists live in Washington but others hail from Idaho, Montana, Michigan, Minnesota, and even as far as Vermont and Virginia. Art collectors will be interested to know that most of the works in the show are available for purchase.

Artist RYAN! Feddersen spoke about the connection that IN THE SPIRIT provides. “As a mixed-heritage native artist living in an urban area, contemporary Indigenous arts is one of the ways I connect to my culture. In the Spirit provides an annual opportunity to bring together native artists to share work and create cultural dialogue. Receiving the Honoring Innovation award for my work in the 2017 exhibition made me feel recognized and supported. I look forward to engaging with this exhibition as it continues to grow and acknowledge the thriving contemporary Indigenous arts field.”

Each spring, Native artists from many states and Canada submit work for consideration by a jury of local artists and curators. The 2018 jury included artist Alex McCarty, Makah, a graduate of Evergreen State College; curator and artist Asia Tail, Cherokee, a graduate of Cooper Union School of Art in New York; and Lynette Miller, head of collections at WSHS.

“The jurying is blind, meaning we don’t know the artists’ names until we have selected the pieces to be exhibited,” said Miller. “I enjoy being surprised when an artist creates something that’s completely different from the work they submitted in earlier years. I love seeing the creative spirit at work!”

The Washington State Historical Society typically adds one work from each annual exhibition to its collection, and the selection is announced at the artist awards ceremony (in 2017, RYAN! Feddersen’s mixed media sculpture Micro Spill was chosen). The 2018 artist awards will include Best in Show, Honoring Innovation, Honoring the Northwest, and Honoring Tradition, along with the purchase prize. During the run of the exhibition, visitors can cast votes for the People’s Choice first and second place awards. Ballots are available in the gallery, and People’s Choice winners are revealed at the culminating festival.

The free IN THE SPIRIT Northwest Native Festival is an indoor/outdoor celebration on Saturday, August 11, from 12:00 to 7:00 PM, co-hosted by the History Museum and Tacoma Art Museum. Celebrate the diverse cultures of the Northwest with a Native arts market, dance, song, music, food, and a designer runway fashion show. The day will end with a performance by special guests Khu.éex’ (pronounced koo-eex), a band co-founded by artist and musician Preston Singletary. Khu.éex’ translates to “Potlatch” in the Tlingit language.  The History Museum and Tacoma Art Museum are excited to bring this immersive festival experience to the community.

For more information, see www.inthespiritarts.org.

 

Toytopia: Play Your Way Down Memory Lane

Rekindle the wonder and delight of your favorite childhood moments at Toytopia at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. The new exhibition is on view until June 10.

What was your favorite childhood toy? A jump rope, a board game or Space Invaders? An Easy Bake Oven or a Slinky? You’ll find your favorites in Toytopia. The exhibition is huge and offers BIG fun! The museum’s fifth floor is a magical toyland where you can play with the world’s largest Etch A Sketch, a life-size doll house, a human-scale Monopoly car and much more. It will delight the “kid” in everyone.

“Our goal was to capture the essence of childhood wonder, that dream of being in a world of toys,” said Troy Carlson, owner of Stage Nine Entertainment Group, who created the exhibition.

For details on the BIG fun, visit
washingtonhistory.org/toytopia

JULIANNA VERBOORT

Toytopia Highlights Include:

  • The world’s largest Etch A Sketch, close to 8 feet tall.
  • Retro Arcade Area with working games to play.
  • A life-size doll house.
  • A life-size Monopoly car and game board—sit inside for a unique photo opportunity!
  • From the movie Big starring Tom Hanks: the giant piano keyboard and the fortune teller machine Zoltar Speaks.
  • LEGO® wall, play area and a fanciful electric train running through an inventive LEGO® landscape.
  • A signature Jack in the Box exploring the science of toys, from Furby® to radiometers.
  • Historic Schylling Tin Toys.
  • Keva Planks, Lincoln Logs and Brain Teasers play areas.

Take a walk down memory lane through decades of toys, many giant-sized as seen here. (Don’t miss the walkthrough doll house, and take a seat in the Monopoly car for a great photo op!) See favorites from your childhood at the Washington State History Museum, Tacoma, through June 10.

22nd Annual Model Train Festival

Welcome to a journey through the miniature world of model trains! The Washington State Historical Society’s 22nd Annual Model Train Festival chugs into town December 22, 2017 and is open through January 1, 2018. The festival takes place at the History Museum in Tacoma. The state’s largest permanent model train layout is always featured at the museum, operated by Puget Sound Model Railroad Engineers; the Model Train Festival brings other railroad clubs from around Puget Sound to share their amazingly detailed layouts. Visitors can travel among the many displays, watch dozens of tiny engines rolling across trestles and through tunnels, talk with the operators, and make their own train creations in the TNT Activity Room.

“It’s certainly the most wonderful time of the year at the museum,” said Molly Wilmoth, the museum’s lead program manager.  “Every available nook and cranny is activated by trains, enchanting kids of every age with intricate, realistic layouts. And the hands-on Activity Room is stocked with toy trains, Legos and Lincoln Logs; it is always a highlight for families.”

Santa is making a stop at the Model Train Festival, too. Come to the museum on Friday, December 22 or Saturday, December 23, from 11:00 AM through 3:00 PM to greet this cheerful visitor from the North Pole and take advantage of a free holiday photo opportunity.

“The Historical Society really enjoys hosting the Model Train Festival. The festival has become a popular holiday tradition for families and their guests because it delights the child in all of us. Everyone has fun watching the model trains and just enjoying the festive atmosphere, not to mention learning a bit about the history of railroads while they’re here,” said the museum’s director, Jennifer Kilmer.

In addition to the model trains, in the Great Hall of Washington History visitors can see artifacts and find out more about how the railroads influenced growth and development in Washington State. The Telegraph – Morse Code Club will present an interactive display chronicling the history of the telegraph as it relates to railroading. Visitors can also stop by Operation Lifesaver’s exhibit, educating the public about safety at railroad highway crossings and the dangers of trespassing on railroad property. Their current focus is the new Amtrak route between Tacoma and Nisqually.

The Tacoma Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society (NRHS) will be on-site to celebrate and promote the 20th anniversary of Rail Camp, which gives teens the opportunity to spend a week with other teens who share railroad interests. The NRHS crew will also honor the end of an era: Since 1914, at least one train per day, almost every day, carried passengers from Portland to Tacoma, rolling along the Puget Sound shoreline and Commencement Bay. That passenger service ends on December 18, 2017. NRHS will share photos and stories of the route’s 103-year history.

Bring the railroad buffs in your life to the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, for this annual celebration of holiday cheer and history. Details at www.ModelTrainFestival.org.

The museum will be closed on December 24, Christmas Eve, and December 25, Christmas Day.

IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts

This summer marks the Washington State Historical Society’s 12th annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition. The show is displayed at the History Museum in Tacoma. Works on view will include textiles, sculptures, paintings, carvings, and basketry. Materials run the gamut from natural elements—stone, shell, clay, wood, minerals, and grass, for example—to products like seed beads, steel, fabric, glass, and linoleum, and even petroleum-based items such as LEDs, plastic straws, and Styrofoam.

Each spring, Native artists from many western states and Canada submit work for consideration by a jury of local artists and curators. The jury has the pleasure of seeing the latest in Native art, and the difficult challenge of winnowing down a selection of works for the exhibition. The 2017 exhibition includes 22 works by artists from Alaska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Washington, and Canada. This dynamic process provides an annual opportunity for the Washington State History Museum to showcase Native artists from the broader region, and for artists to win honors and awards. Each year the museum adds one work from the exhibition to its collection.

IN THE SPIRIT continues the connection between the Historical Society’s Native collections and the vibrant contemporary arts scene. The exhibition is ever-changing, reflecting the variety of works entered for jurying, the artists who choose to enter, the interests and backgrounds of the jurors, as well as changes in political and social contexts,” said Mary Mikel Stump, Director of Audience Engagement at WSHS. “It is an honor to meet these artists. Some works are deeply influenced by tradition while others use that tradition as a jumping off point for a more contemporary take, and, yet, some beautifully blend traditional methods and materials and contemporary forms. Truly, the past is present in these exemplary artworks.”

The exhibition is on view through Sunday, August 20, and is displayed in two adjacent galleries on the museum’s 5th floor. At the opening celebration on June 15, artist awards will be presented for Best in Show, Honoring Innovation, Honoring the Northwest, and Honoring Tradition. During the run of the exhibition, museum visitors can cast votes for the People’s Choice First and Second Place awards. Voting ballots are available in both galleries.

The People’s Choice awards will be presented at the free IN THE SPIRIT Northwest Native Festival. Mark your calendars for this indoor/outdoor celebration on Saturday, August 19, from 10:00 AM through 5:00 PM. The History Museum is co-hosting the festival with Tacoma Art Museum (TAM). Admission to both museums is free. In addition to a Native arts market, the festival includes dance, song, music, food, and a runway fashion show featuring Native designers. Both the History Museum and TAM have long celebrated Native American arts and culture, and the museums are pleased to collaborate in bringing this enriching festival to the community.

“The tradition of opening IN THE SPIRIT on Third Thursday makes the occasion extra special,” said Lead Program Manager Molly Wilmoth. “We can best honor the artists and feature their amazing works by opening the exhibition when the museum is accessible to everyone. We hope that the community will enjoy the opportunity to meet some of the artists in person and see their works.”

The History Museum is free every Third Thursday from 2:00 – 8:00 PM. Free Third Thursdays are generously sponsored by Columbia Bank.

washingtonhistory.org

IN THE SPIRIT

The Washington State Historical Society will hold its 11th annual summer public event on Saturday, Aug. 13, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. in Tacoma. IN THE SPIRIT Native Arts Market and Festival highlights handmade Native American artwork and features musicians, dancers, demonstrators, traditional Native foods, and much more.

In addition to the nearly 20 vendors, some of the performers will include:

  • Vince Redhouse, Grammy-nominated Navajo flute player born and raised in California. He has played music since the age of seven and continues to love creating music. Not only will he be the first performance of the day, but will also be selling his CDs and other merchandise throughout the day as a festival vendor.
  • Alaska Kuteeyaa Dancers, who have performed at the IN THE SPIRIT festival every year since its inception in 2006 and tend to be a crowd favorite. Tiny Barril has an incredible ability to tell native story through song, dance and presence. Adorned in button blankets and masks, the group can transform the museum into a gathering about a fire in the Alaskan wilderness.
  • Rona Yellow Robe Walsh, named the 2014 Native American Museum Awards’ Flutist of the Year. She is a member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe and was born and raised in Montana. Rona has three albums available and has performed at IN THE SPIRIT for several years.
  • The Le-La-La Dancers from Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. They have traveled and performed as a traditional Kwakwaka’wakw dance company throughout the world for over 25 years. Their performance will highlight various spiritual entities through dancing, music and masks. They often play a large role in performances at the annual Aboriginal Cultural Festival in Victoria.

The IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibit opened at the History Museum on May 28. Native American artists submitted their works for consideration by a jury who selected pieces for inclusion in the show. The jury then selected the following winners:

dirt-and-rocks_602

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the extent of the juried art exhibit, which can be viewed at www.InTheSpiritArts.org, museum patrons have been voting for their favorite piece. The Washington State Historical Society  will present the winner with the highly-coveted People’s Choice Award during the Aug. 13 festival. The exhibit closes the following day.

This year’s market and festival will take place inside the History Museum due to ongoing construction on the Museum’s outdoor plaza and amphitheater. For more information on the construction project, please visit www.washingtonhistory.org/construction.

Cutting Edge: Art Quilts of Washington

quiltsQuilters quilt and painters paint, but there is a world of di-mension behind the work of fabric artists. As the newest exhibit at the Washington State History Museum—Cutting Edge: Art Quilts of Washington—shows, quilting is an artistic medium in and of itself.

“Traditionally, quilts were hand-sewn from scraps of fabric to meet a practical need—they kept families warm during the winter months,” said Lynette Miller, head of collections for the Washington State Historical Society and curator of the quilt exhibit. “Over time, they have evolved from simply being functional into something decorative and creative, and finally into a means of artistic expression no different from painting or sculpting.”

Cutting Edge: Art Quilts of Washington is a collaborative effort between the Washington State Historical Society, which also has a number of historic quilts from its collection on display, and the Contemporary Quilt Art Association, a diverse group of artists, teach-ers, writers and collectors from throughout Washington. The juried exhibit features the work of association members, who view quilts as an exciting medium of expression and a viable contemporary art form.

“Today’s quilt artists may still use sewing machines, but they are just as likely to use more contemporary technology such as computers and printers or less traditional techniques such as painting, hand-dyeing and bleaching,” said Colleen Wise, president of the Contemporary Quilt Art Association. “They may embellish their work with beads, metal or found objects. They are using quilt-making as a means of expression rather than comfort. Quilt-making has evolved into a true art form with a distinctive American history.”

Cutting Edge: Art Quilts of Washington through Aug. 21 at the history museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma.

LEAH GROUT

For additional information: washingtonhistory.org