Straight From The Heart

Straight from the Heart, United Way’s ninth Annual Dinner Party and Auction celebrates community spirit in action. Over 220 people gathered at Indian Summer Golf & Country Club on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, to enjoy amazing food and wine and participate in a silent and live auction to raise money in support of United Way’s mission: to fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in our community. Emcees Nancy Leson and Dick Stein from KNKX 88.5’s Food for Thought segment were joined on stage by Jeff Kingsbury of Stokes Auction Group, Seattle. Keynotes included United Way’s new executive director Chris Wells and United Way’s board president Liz Davis. The evening was both fun and successful.

Star Chefs On Broadway

The Pantages Theater was transformed into a 1920s speakeasy with rum runners and floozies hosting gambling games and enticing guests to try a variety of giggle waters so delicious they should have been prohibited. Dapper gents and dolled-up dames enjoyed a variety of delicious appetizers in the lobby before going into the 100-year-old theater. They were served a four-course dinner by Asado along with fine wines and dessert, and a delicious “last bite” by Corina Bakery. The entertainment continued throughout the evening with a dazzling program by EnJoy Productions.
Funds raised totaled in excess of $310,000, including the first round of seat-naming opportunities sold for the Pantages Theater renovation.

Twinstar Celebrates 80 Years

It all started during the Great Depression, in 1934, when an Olympia High School math teacher wanted to find a way to help his fellow teachers put down roots and be part of the community. On a teacher’s salary it was difficult to obtain a loan to buy a house or a car unless you were willing to repay that loan at 17 percent or more. By 1937 that teacher was able to enlist the support of 15 other local teachers. In January 1938 they started Thurston County Teachers Credit Union.

The fledgling credit union made its first loan for $150. It was off to a bustling start and it kept growing. In 1981 it merged with other credit unions from Grays Harbor County. This necessitated a name change to Twin County Credit Union. This change lasted only a year. The organization expanded again, bringing in credit unions from Centralia and Clark and Pierce Counties. In 2006 a new name was revealed: TwinStar Credit Union.

Because of TwinStar’s start as a teachers credit union, says Paulette Raico, director of marketing, “education is pretty special for us.” She notes that members can apply for college scholarships or for Classroom Cash.

“We have an employee who spends hours on the road,” Raico continues, “teaching financial literacy in classrooms from Tacoma to Portland, Yelm to Ocean Shores. You may not know this, but banks had to be compelled by the government to give back to local communities. Credit unions, on the other hand, have always been close to our members’ communities and the causes our members care about.”

To celebrate its history in the community, TwinStar Credit Union has created an 80-year commemorative booklet that includes historical facts and photos, and quotes from members and employees. TwinStar has also planted a ceremonial oak tree to commemorate 80 years of service in the community at the Lacey Administration building.

We congratulate TwinStar for 80 years serving the community!

HILLARY RYAN

For Additional Information:
TwinStar Credit Union
twinstarcu.com/branches

McMenamins Renovates the Elks Lodge

A crumbling façade is about to be reborn. For decades, the prominent Tacoma Elks Lodge has perched vacant on the hill at 565 Broadway downtown, not unlike a large white albatross. The substantial stone structure commands attention. Its stature, intricacy and lore have long beckoned to natives and passersby. Soon, thanks to the cultural and rehabilitative wizardry of McMenamins, we’ll be able to go inside.

McMenamins has an undeniable track record of crafting destinations that are inventive, engaging and charming. Using regional themes, local artists, carefully chosen materials and a keen understanding of Northwest history, they have breathed new life into dozens of historical properties.

Designed by É. Frère Champney in the second Renaissance Revival style, the Elks Temple was built in 1915 and 1916, when popular fraternal organizations were making big impacts on communities. On the south side of the building, a sprawling stairway scales the hill. Modeled after the Scalinata di Spagna in Rome, the Tacoma staircase carries the same name, in English: the Spanish Steps.

According to local historian Steve Dunkelberger, brothers Mike and Brian McMenamin spend countless months researching the history of an area and draw from that past to craft their decor and entertainment features. “They know how to inform and entertain with the simplest of details. The Tacoma project won’t be any different from that ‘voodoo’ they do so well,” he says. “Everything they do is top-notch.”

McMenamins Elks Lodge will include 44 guest rooms with private baths. The grand ballroom is being transformed into hotel rooms with terraced views of Tacoma’s waterfront. Inspired spaces will host live music, events, weddings and meetings. Three restaurants and a McMenamins brewery will be highlights of the entertainment. (There are also rumors of a “secret bar”—shhh!) Gardens on site will supply fresh, seasonal ingredients. Local artists are being commissioned to paint murals, and some large graffiti that accumulated during the building’s vacancy will be preserved. Stay tuned for the grand opening in early 2019.

Take a staycation at other area McMenamins hotel and entertainment properties, the Anderson School in Bothell and the Olympic Club in Centralia. Dine and drink at McMenamins on Seattle’s Queen Anne or Capitol Hill, in Mill Creek, or at Olympia’s Spar Café.

EMILY HAPPY

For Additional Information:
McMenamins
mcmenamins.com

The Greatest Summer In Puget Sound Yet

Summer here and so are countless events throughout the South Sound. Surrounding cities are preparing to provide their locals and tourists with unforgettable events this year.

Puyallup

Puyallup knows the best way to welcome summer. The 79th annual Meeker Days Art & Music Festival will be happening June 15–17. Over 200 vendors serve treats like elephant ears, cotton candy and ice cream, and pour beer and taste-test wine. There will be music for everyone, too, whether country, rock or alternative. To cap it all off, the Buick car show is ready to show itself off in style. The city also hosts a farmers market through the summer, promoting local produce and fresh goods.
puyallupmainstreet.com

Tacoma

Summer events in Tacoma are endless. Learn about the native Puyallup people through a canoe excursion. Enjoy local music every second Sunday at W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory. Learn about nearby tide pools. Sample the delicious and varied food truck offerings in July. There’s never a dull moment all summer in Tacoma.
traveltacoma.com

Gig Harbor

Is there a more beautiful way to kick off summer than the 21st Annual Gig Harbor Garden Tour? Take a guided tour by volunteers and ogle the floral scenery, and then enjoy treats from local vendors. Throughout the summer Gig Harbor hosts free concerts, rain or shine. On Aug. 11 you can support or participate in the Galloping Gertie Half Marathon, which takes participants through scenic byways and over the Tacoma Narrows Bridge.
gigharborguide.com

Sumner

Sumner hosts the best summer classic, the rhubarb festival. Another Sumner classic is the car show. From old hot rods to antique farm trucks, this event sees countless visitors taking in the array of cars.
promotesumner.com

Lacey

Spend the 3rd of July in Lacey, a town that knows how to celebrate our country’s birthday in style. There’s a plethora of free children’s activities, such as playgrounds and booths, and parents can enjoy music from the Olson Brothers and the Funaddicts. On July 7 get your summer barbecue fill at the South Sound BBQ Festival. This event entails a professional BBQ cook-off and several other food vendors dishing out tender meat and other foods throughout the day.
ci.lacey.wa.us

Olympia

The Olympia Air Show, marking its 20th year, has become a beloved tradition to locals. On Labor Day Weekend, don’t forget about Harbor Days. As always, spectators can expect tugboat races, arts and crafts, classic fair food, and live entertainment including tribal activities. This event is in its 45th year and continues to be free, fun, and highly anticipated.
experienceolympia.com

Centralia

Visit downtown Centralia this summer for the area’s best shopping, dining and entertainment all located in a beautifully restored National Historic District. Downtown events include the three-day Antique Fest July 27-29 and the Hub City car Show on Aug. 25.
downtowncentralia.org

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW

Meet Reknowned Chef Roy Yamaguchi

Culinary pioneer Roy Yamaguchi is regarded as an international culinary visionary and the creator of Hawaiian fusion cuisine. The founder and owner of Roy’s restaurants will be Saint Martin’s University on Nov. 3 to host Saint Martin’s Gala 2018: Hawaii and Pacific Islands.

Born in Tokyo, Yamaguchi had his first taste of seafood bought fresh at seaside piers on Maui, while visiting his grandparents. It is these fond memories that would shape his future career. At 19, he graduated from the Culinary Institute of America in New York as a master chef. After moving to Los Angeles, he served as executive chef at La Serene. Yamaguchi then decided to head closer to his roots. He moved to Hawaii and opened the first Roy’s in 1988.

Yamaguchi’s numerous accolades include the prestigious James Beard Award. He hosted six seasons of the television show Hawaii Cooks with Roy Yamaguchi. He is also the author of three cookbooks.

The following are excerpts from our interview with the renowned chef.

What is your best-kept cooking secret?
A lot of hard work at the end of the day. I love what I do. We make sure that people come first. Our people and the people who come through the doors are always the priority.

Why is good food important to the next generation?
Cooking with your kids is important because then they get used to having good food. I recommend bringing kids to the restaurant early so they learn to talk with the server—and also learn about manners and nutrition. Food is an international language, it’s a tool to connect all of us.

Why is the presentation of your dish so important?
People eat with their eyes. We like [the dishes] to look picturesque so our guests savor every bite.

Why are you excited to be cooking at the Saint Martin’s Gala?
I’m excited to be a part of the educational environment. At Saint Martin’s we will be able to have fun and do some inspirational cooking.

What should our readers know about you?
I love music and I’m a drummer. Playing the drums is like working in a kitchen. Everyone plays a part in the production of food in the kitchen, and in a band everyone plays a part in the harmony of the band.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information and to purchase tickets:
Saint Martin’s Gala
stmartin.edu/hawaiigala2018