APCC Celebrates 25th Anniversary

It was 1996 and Patsy Suh O’Connell was searching for a way to honor her recently deceased father. She decided to create a nonprofit that honored his Korean heritage. She brought together a small group of citizens representing three generations of Americans from Asian and Pacific Islander heritage and through their vision, Asia Pacific Cultural Center was formed.

APCC, located on South Tacoma Way in Tacoma, represents 47 countries and cultures and offers programs and services honoring their distinct artistry, business protocols, history, and social practices. The organization also offers a variety of educational, cultural, and language programs throughout the year that are divided into three categories.

Cultural Program Events and Activities, including an annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration, are held at the Tacoma Dome. An authentic Polynesian luau, a Korean Chuseok festival and Samoa Cultural Week are some of the many activities that make up the first category. The second category is APCC Youth Programs and Activities which ranges from summer learning programs to the Promised Leaders of Tomorrow program that assists local Asian and Polynesian students in reaching their goal of graduating. Food support programs, vaccination clinics and a wide variety of community support programs make up the final category of Outreach Activities and Projects.

To commemorate 25 years, APCC is hosting a 25th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, November 6 from 6-9 p.m. at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center. Attendees will enjoy delicious food, music, and a special presentation from students of Kunjang University in South Korea as well as learn about APCC’s new building project. Tickets for the Anniversary Celebration can be purchased by contacting APCC at 253.383.3900.

Asia Pacific Cultural Center is a not-for-profit formed in 1996 with the mission to bridge communities and generations through art, culture, education, and business. It serves as an interactive cultural crossroads between local and international communities.

For Additional Information and Tickets
apcc96.org

LYNN CASTLE

Asia Pacific Cultural Center Steps Up to Help Community

A quick visit to Asia Pacific Cultural Center’s Facebook page and you see it instantly. This organization does so much for the South Sound community, but especially during the current pandemic.

From hosting free COVID-19 testing in their parking lot every other Wednesday for months, to providing free food giveaways from the Tacoma Farmers Market weekly in the summer, APCC dug deep and helped often. Whether it was giving away thousands of masks and sanitation tools or school supplies to kids as virtual school started up, APCC helped everyone in the community.

According to APCC Executive Director, Lua Pritchard, “Helping our community is part of our core values. It is what Asian Pacific Islanders do every day, but it was especially important during the recent crisis.”

Throughout the months of the crisis, Pritchard and her team worked with several organizations to touch as many people as possible. A great example was the COVID-19 Assistance for Families program which partnered APCC with the Pierce County Connected Fund to give away $75 grocery store gift cards in late December when struggling families needed the help the most. Just days before, APCC hosted a toy giveaway with local Kiwanis chapters and free lunch from Northwest SHARE.

APCC also worked with the Pierce County Management Team and Tacoma Pierce County Health Department for free flu shots as well as the COVID-19 Testing. They worked with Tacoma Project Access to ensure people had health care coverage options. APCC promoted the Census, how to apply for government-funded small business loans in various languages, and educated the community about the Family and Medical Leave laws to ensure everyone knew their rights. And most importantly, APCC’s Promised Leaders of Tomorrow team continued their work with the youth of the Tacoma and Bethel School Districts through virtual learning programs providing support wherever it was needed.

Asia Pacific Cultural Center
asiapacificculturalcenter.org
facebook/AsiaPacificCulturalCenter

LYNN CASTLE

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

 

February 8-13, 11am each day

 

Virtual Event

 

facebook.com/AsiaPacificCulturalCenter

 

APCC’s virtual 23 rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration is a week of cultural programming free on APCC’s Facebook Live and YouTube channel. For more details, check our Facebook page. Each day you will be able to watch as performers from different Asia Pacific countries show their pride in their culture and heritage

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

 

February 8-13, 11am each day

 

Virtual Event

 

facebook.com/AsiaPacificCulturalCenter

 

APCC’s virtual 23 rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration is a week of cultural programming free on APCC’s Facebook Live and YouTube channel. For more details, check our Facebook page. Each day you will be able to watch as performers from different Asia Pacific countries show their pride in their culture and heritage

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

23rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration

 

February 8-13, 11am each day

 

Virtual Event

 

facebook.com/AsiaPacificCulturalCenter

 

APCC’s virtual 23 rd Annual Asia Pacific New Year Celebration is a week of cultural programming free on APCC’s Facebook Live and YouTube channel. For more details, check our Facebook page. Each day you will be able to watch as performers from different Asia Pacific countries show their pride in their culture and heritage

Chinese Opera Comes to Tacoma

Audience members will be mesmerized by a cast of acclaimed performers as Thousand Faces Chinese Opera comes to Pantages Theater in Tacoma on May 13. One of the oldest dramatic art forms, Chinese opera has developed into unique regional styles. It has evolved beyond the tradition of singing and dancing to incorporate skillful visual elements. These include face changing, martial arts, acrobatics and even fire breathing.

Yu Long, who has perfected her craft of face changing over 30 years, explains her art as quick, accurate and beautiful. Spectators might call it magical and mysterious. In face changing, the artist wears a silk face mask to represent a character or emotion. During the performance the mask is changed repeatedly with the slightest movement and imperceptibly to the eyes of the audience.

Long was born and raised in Chengdu, the birthplace of Sichuan opera. She pleaded with officials to allow a woman to study the art of face changing. Previously only men were allowed. Her dedication led to her being recognized by the Chinese government as the only national “female inheritor” of Sichuan opera.

Long will be in impressive company for Thousand Faces Chinese Opera. Joining her are Bole Zhao (赵宝乐), national opera producer and popular host of China’s Opera Channel; China national actors Wenge Hu (胡文阁), the best Mei-style Peking opera performer, and Yi Long (龙毅), a Sichuan opera performer who breathes fire; Shijia Jiang (姜适迦), a well-known Peking opera performer and professor of drama; and Lucy Wu (吴小妹), Peking opera jinghu performer and winner of the China Culture Ministry’s Outstanding Youth Artist Achievement Award. The show will also include demonstrations of calligraphy, painting, tea arts, puppetry and acrobatics.

Thousand Faces Chinese Opera will be performed in Seattle on May 12 and Tacoma on May 13. The performances are sponsored by the Asia Pacific Cultural Center, America Long Yu Chinese Traditional Culture and Face Changing Art Academy, Confucius Institute of the State of Washington, and .

For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Asia Pacific Cultural Center at 253.383.3900 or visit asiapacificculturalcenter.org/chineseopera. by Julie leydelmeyer

www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvNyGnlBzg0

Asia Pacific Cultural Center

4851 South Tacoma Way, Tacoma, WA

 

 

 

Asia Pacific Cultural Center: Finding a Home

Since 1996 the Asia Pacific Cultural Center has been working toward establishing a permanent home for itself in Tacoma. Throughout the years the APCC has been housed in several buildings in the Tacoma area, hoping the whole time for a permanent location best suited to its needs.

The APCC represents about 47 countries and educates the public about the rich cultures within each one. It hosts a number of programs and events throughout the year. On the first Saturday of each month this year, for example, the public is invited to the Taste of Asia 2017 cooking series. In September the APCC presents the Korean ChuSeok Festival. This November it will host a tour of Thailand.

In seeking a new home, the APCC has had difficulty raising adequate funding. Those who have been supporting the project since 1994 believe one of the most exciting opportunities for the project so far has come through five donated acres at Point Ruston on Commencement Bay.

According to a July 21, 2017 article in The News Tribune by reporter Jared Brown, the center would ideally feature gardens, a theater, a food area, grocery store, and housing, for a total of $94 million. Yet the land donation wouldn’t allow the APCC to construct all of these elements. Without the housing units and grocery store, the new set price would be $61 million. Those involved in the development of the center, wrote Brown, are hoping to draw a large sum of that goal from a federal program designed to attract foreign investment into job-creating projects in return for a fast-tracked visa.

Faaluaina Pritchard, APCC executive director, reports that $400,000 in cash or pledges has been raised to date. Donations are welcome on the APCC’s website: asiapacificculturalcenter.org. As stated there, the project’s mission is “to bridge communities and generations through arts, culture, education, and business.” Ensuring a permanent home will propel the center to carry out this mission to much of the greater Puget Sound area. by Jordan Marie Martinez

Honoring Excellence, Creativity & Achievements

Washington’s governors began the tradition of honoring artists, arts organizations, arts educators and cultural leaders in 1966 with the Governor’s Arts Awards. Heritage Awards were added in 1989 to honor tradition bearers and heritage organizations. Coordinated by the Washington State Arts Commission, or ArtsWA, the awards are some of the most prestigious bestowed by the governor.

In 2016, honorees included artist Barbara Earl Thomas (Seattle), Vashon Center for the Arts (Vashon), Tejano musician Oscar Galvan (Toppenish), Asia Pacific Cultural Center (Tacoma), and Dr. Quinton Morris (Renton), who received the Young Art Leader Award.

Six awards will be presented at this year’s awards dinner at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma on Nov. 14 from 6 to 9 p.m. The public is invited to attend.

“Over the years, more than 200 individuals and organizations have received Governor’s Arts & Heritage Awards,” said Karen Hanan, executive director of ArtsWA.

Nominations are accepted May through July each year. The nominations are evaluated by a five-member panel and forwarded to the board of the Washington State Arts Commission for review. The board’s recommendation is forwarded to the governor for final approval.

For the last three years the awards event has taken place in Seattle, Hanan said. “We’re excited to bring the dinner to Tacoma and invite all to come support this year’s extraordinary recipients.”

For more about the Governor’s Arts & Heritage Awards, visit the State Arts Commission website.

GLENDA CARINO

For additional information:
ArtsWA
arts.wa.gov
2017gaha.brownpapertickets.com