How To Incorporate Biophilic Design into Your Home

Biophilic design is not just about bringing the outdoors in; the focus is on indoor air quality, natural light, and color schemes grounded in nature.

Indoor Air Quality

Be mindful of the items you bring into your home such as harsh chemical cleaners, scented candles, and other toxic chemicals. Open windows and let the fresh air and sound of nature find the way into your home and your mind. Clear out clutter and change your air filters on a regular basis.

Add Live Plants

They increase oxygen and purify the air and improve your indoor air quality. You want to select plants that are a good fit for the level of care you can provide. If you have pets, make sure you are selecting plants that will not harm them or small children if that is a concern.

If you do not have a green thumb, faux plants may seem like an obvious choice, but they do not provide the same effect. The main disadvantage of fake plants is that they have no health benefits and most are made from synthetic plastic which actually adds the toxins in your air.

Maximize Natural Light

Natural light in a home is always better than artificial light. It bathes your room in a rich full-spectrum hue that light bulbs can only hope to duplicate, and it increases your body’s feel-good serotonin levels. But if you do not have natural light, you can use natural light bulbs providing high-quality light, no eye strain, better focus, and a happier mood. If you work from home, they can enhance productivity.

Incorporate Colors Found in Nature

Most people think of the dark green of leaves, the warm orange of the sunset, and the earthy brown of the mud. But colors do not need to be rustic to be grounded in nature; layers of whites and cream can also feel very tranquil and work well when used as a base. You can add high-contrast neutrals for a more dramatic color scheme. Greens, browns, and grays work well also because they lend a warm cozy feel to your interior environment. We recommend choosing three colors and repeating them throughout. This creates continuity and the combination of almost any three colors will work. You can also add natural materials, shapes found in nature, and large-scale art.

For Additional Information
Alinda Morris Interior Design
Instagram: @alindamorris

Designed to Maximize Sweeping Views

The Elliott Bay House is located in Seattle on a narrow site facing Puget Sound. The house has a south-facing courtyard containing a reflecting pool with two “floating” basalt boulders. In the yard, the reflecting pool gathers all the roof drainage from the house and the living room roof downspout, providing a 10-foot dramatic waterfall. The living space has been designed around sweeping westerly views of Puget Sound. By contrast, the east side of the space is an intimate courtyard with a reflecting pool.

The exposed wood beams in the living space change pitch dramatically along the length of the room. This shifting of the beam slopes creates a sense of progressive movement and dynamism in the living space, allowing the architecture to animate a visual path from the reflecting pool to the sweeping view of Puget Sound. The roof’s architecture celebrates the visual diagonal path from the reflecting pool to Puget Sound.

Upstairs, the master bedroom cantilevers out toward the Puget Sound view. Tall glass walls wrap the bedroom on three sides, providing a panorama of water and mountains.

Modern craft is prevalent in the house. A waterjet-cut steel fence and gate lead to the house entry. Exterior siding is custom-milled red cedar. The steel and wood stairs have waterjetcut steel railings with a hand-drawn pattern. The beech interior cabinets have a CNC-milled pattern called “imaginary landscape.”

Beyond its natural beauty, the house was designed for high energy efficiency and is heavily insulated with a radiant hydronic heat system. Large glass areas with generous roof overhangs provide natural lighting and ventilation, making this the perfect design for Pacific Northwest living and climate.

For Additional Information
FINNE Architects: Nils Finne, Design Principal
Chris Hawley, Project Manager/Architect
Builder: SBI Construction

Photos: Benjamin Benschneider

MORGAN LUCAS

The HeART of the Home Cabinets by Trivonna

Cabinets by Trivonna of Lacey pride themselves on a design experience that is uniquely customized to their individual client’s dreams and wishes.

Trivonna brings to life an artful design plan built around their customer’s need and budget. We’ve all discovered that the ‘heart of the home’ isn’t just for the cook anymore. Often our kitchen plays host not only to baking and cooking, but to children’s and adult art, science and homework projects, and even dad’s auto repair, fishing and tackle shop.

“The kitchen has become a gathering place meant for entertaining guests and gathering family alike,” states owner Amber Bevacqua. “Our clients enjoy artful and thoughtful design built around the specific and functional needs for their space.”

Navigating the myriad of decisions on textiles and design options can be daunting. Trivonna has created a design studio offering a nurturing environment that helps clients realize their best kitchen design.

Whatever your kitchen design dream, creating a work of art and functional space built for you and your family is what Cabinets by Trivonna does beautifully. Be sure to visit their creative space and showroom in Lacey and meet Rick and Amber Bevacqua. They help make dream kitchens a reality.

Cabinets by Trivonna
4444 Lacey Blvd SE, Unit G, Lacey
360.539.5057
cabinetsbytrivonna.com

BY DANA PETHIA

Building Your Dream Home

Building your dream home can be exciting, but it can also be scary. Working with an architect that you trust and appreciate can make all the difference in keeping those fears in check.

Jennifer Weddermann, AIA, the owner of Weddermann Architecture, PLLC, in Tacoma shared a few tips with ShowCase Magazine recently on how to successfully navigate the process.

The first step she suggests may seem like the most obvious. Have a piece of land in mind. “No piece of land is truly flat, and no two sites are alike as far as access, neighbors, views, wind, or slope,” said Weddermann.

Before you buy the land or building, ask your architect to complete a feasibility study. Using online tools provided by cities and counties or even Google Earth, the study can determine setbacks, height limits, logical access, and even snow and wind load. According to Weddermann, “You’ll know up front if the land will work for your overall plan in terms of size and use.” Once the land is selected, your architect will work up a proposal for their scope of work. This is a good time to definitively determine the scale of your project, since this will translate into overall budget and architectural fees.

To communicate well during the design process, have visuals depicting what you like. At this early stage, it is important to think about the whole structure. The architect will need to know how you live and will come back with options for the layout.

Before permitting takes place, energy credits and materials should be considered as well as the selection of your general contractor. They can be a great resource for coordination with structural engineering and provide insight into products and techniques to save money.

Final steps include a thorough and critical review of the entire set of documents, a meeting with the general contractor to ensure you can afford the building before you submit for permits, and then periodic site visits by your architect.

“Your architect acts as a steward of your money throughout the building process,” added Weddermann.

For Additional Information
Weddermann Architecture
weddermann.com

LYNN CASTLE

8 Tips For Choosing A Kitchen Designer

Very few homeowners have the knowledge to design, build and install a new kitchen. That’s why many of us employ an expert kitchen designer. But how do you know if you are choosing the right kitchen designer to work with? It comes down to a bit of research and gut feelings. Design mistakes are costly, so it’s worth connecting with more than one kitchen designer to get a feel for the designer who is right for you. Consider the following eight tips when choosing a kitchen designer:

  1. Design ability and creativity
    How do you know just how good a given designer’s ability is? Check how long they have been designing kitchens. Ask to see some examples of their work. Will they be able to show you 3-D visuals of designs they create for you before going ahead with any work? Conceptual design can look amazing, but you want a designer with an eye for the practical realities of kitchen life too.
  2. Technical knowledge
    Your kitchen designer should have architectural drafting and construction experience. He or she needs to have a good knowledge of buildings and industry trends to bring you a state-ofthe-art kitchen design.
  3. Product knowledge
    Providing the right products and appliances for your kitchen also requires knowledge and skill. Good kitchen designers will know trusted cabinet makers and appliance firms to work with.
  4. Experience
    Everyone has to start somewhere, but for making such a big financial investment in your home, you want to choose a designer with experience. Ask to see examples of your kitchen designer’s work.
  5. The ability to understand client needs
    Be clear about all the aspects of kitchen design you want. The best kitchen designers will offer advice and support and guide you to achieve a kitchen design you are completely happy with. They will want to listen to all of your ideas and concerns. Your designer should be asking questions about your living space, your lifestyle, your cooking style and your kitchen needs. Always remember that you are the client, so you can set the terms.
  6. Communication skills
    Kitchen designers will need to communicate clearly with building contractors, electricians, plumbers and other professionals to get your job done on time and on budget.
  7. Testimonials
    A recommendation by friends or family is a good place to start, but don’t let that be the only factor informing your decision. Ask your preferred kitchen designer if you can speak with one of their previous clients. Check whether your designer kept to deadlines and responded promptly to any concerns.
  8. Qualifications and credentials
    Make sure your kitchen designer has the qualifications and credentials claimed. You want to know that your designer not only has an eye for great design, but that they’ve studied and understand construction, plumbing and electrical technologies. They should adhere to a professional code of conduct as well.

LEAH GROUT

Point Ruston Stylish Condo Virtually Designed

William Flanagan Pash-Uhn Photography

Condo owners at Point Ruston asked Alinda Morris Design to take on the challenge of designing and installing their dream house in time for them to enjoy the sun in their new home.  “This was such an exciting project,” said Morris. “We are all about creating stylish, eclectic yet clean-line spaces for our clients.”

The project began with several conceptual furniture plan options. Once a finalized layout was created, several design boards with furniture selections and lighting options were offered to the client. Alinda Morris Design provided the condo with furnishings, artwork, window treatments, and updated lighting fixtures.​

“When working to personalize new construction, we combine styles and periods through a wide variety of items to achieve a curated look,” Morris explained. The design team added small details to the home as well as larger pieces to create a luxurious yet comfortable feel. “We wanted our clients to feel like they are on vacation all the time but we did not want anything in the space to feel formal or precious,” Morris said.​

The house showcased a simple color palette with accent colors and patterns layered throughout to add interest to various rooms. Morris’s team knew that art, accessories, and interior styling were very important to their clients, so they selected custom artwork focusing on the theme of travel from artists they love. The completed space is cozy, sophisticated, and still great for an energetic family.

“Not only is our home stunning,” the owners said, “the whole process was also completely painless and was done 100% virtually. I could have as much or as little input as I wanted. When we arrived at our home everything was complete and perfect.”

It’s noteworthy how seamless this project was as all the work on this project “was done 100% remotely,” said Morris.  The homeowners actually live in Chicago and desired a second home in the Pacific Northwest. During these times, it is a relief that clients are still able to partner long distance and enjoy design services and virtual consultations. 

alindamorrisinteriordesign.com