Team RED: Resourceful • Experienced • Dedicated

Results of a recent survey found that nearly one in four seniors felt they could not move, either because they couldn’t afford moving costs or because they didn’t believe they could sell their home. Local Keller Williams Realtor and founder of Team RED, Kathy Kleber, and her team of nine real estate agents have created a plan to tackle issues specifically facing transitioning seniors.

Team RED agents, an acronym for Resourceful, Experienced and Dedicated, offer special services to support seniors. They help with each step of the selling process from getting the senior connected with services in the community and locations for their next home to supporting them in any upgrades their property needs to maximize the selling price.

“Almost every senior specialist I know has come from a senior association, including me,” said Kleber recently. Nearly 20 years ago, Kleber and her parents were facing their own housing dilemma. Kleber’s dad’s health was failing but her mom was very active and social. A move to Wesley Homes, a United Methodist Community for active senior living in Des Moines, became their home. Kleber’s father passed a year or so after the move, but her mom lives there to this day where she is active, travels and serves on the board of everything.

“That experience taught me to understand the journey and love on seniors as they work through this time in their lives,” she said. “And, it became my heart’s work,” she added. Team RED is a family affair with her husband, Kirk Kleber, a founding member, and daughter, Ellisa Greer, as part of the team. Greer’s background in geriatric nursing is a huge benefit to the Team RED organization. Plus, her service in the Army and that of her Dad, Kirk, in the Navy, adds to their concierge-level service for all veterans.

The biggest difference in Team RED’s approach is to get the seniors moved and settled first. According to Kleber, “We always start with the person — where are you going and what are you taking with you?” Once that is settled, then a project manager steps in to oversee necessary renovations by one of their three sets of general contracting teams. Then it is time to stage the home and implement a successful sale.

“Serving with heart, homes for all life’s seasons,” remains Kleber’s motto.

For Additional Information
Team RED
bit.ly/3EZLce3
253.449.8088

LYNN CASTLE

How To Incorporate Biophilic Design into Your Home

Biophilic design is not just about bringing the outdoors in; the focus is on indoor air quality, natural light, and color schemes grounded in nature.

Indoor Air Quality

Be mindful of the items you bring into your home such as harsh chemical cleaners, scented candles, and other toxic chemicals. Open windows and let the fresh air and sound of nature find the way into your home and your mind. Clear out clutter and change your air filters on a regular basis.

Add Live Plants

They increase oxygen and purify the air and improve your indoor air quality. You want to select plants that are a good fit for the level of care you can provide. If you have pets, make sure you are selecting plants that will not harm them or small children if that is a concern.

If you do not have a green thumb, faux plants may seem like an obvious choice, but they do not provide the same effect. The main disadvantage of fake plants is that they have no health benefits and most are made from synthetic plastic which actually adds the toxins in your air.

Maximize Natural Light

Natural light in a home is always better than artificial light. It bathes your room in a rich full-spectrum hue that light bulbs can only hope to duplicate, and it increases your body’s feel-good serotonin levels. But if you do not have natural light, you can use natural light bulbs providing high-quality light, no eye strain, better focus, and a happier mood. If you work from home, they can enhance productivity.

Incorporate Colors Found in Nature

Most people think of the dark green of leaves, the warm orange of the sunset, and the earthy brown of the mud. But colors do not need to be rustic to be grounded in nature; layers of whites and cream can also feel very tranquil and work well when used as a base. You can add high-contrast neutrals for a more dramatic color scheme. Greens, browns, and grays work well also because they lend a warm cozy feel to your interior environment. We recommend choosing three colors and repeating them throughout. This creates continuity and the combination of almost any three colors will work. You can also add natural materials, shapes found in nature, and large-scale art.

For Additional Information
Alinda Morris Interior Design
Instagram: @alindamorris

Designed to Maximize Sweeping Views

The Elliott Bay House is located in Seattle on a narrow site facing Puget Sound. The house has a south-facing courtyard containing a reflecting pool with two “floating” basalt boulders. In the yard, the reflecting pool gathers all the roof drainage from the house and the living room roof downspout, providing a 10-foot dramatic waterfall. The living space has been designed around sweeping westerly views of Puget Sound. By contrast, the east side of the space is an intimate courtyard with a reflecting pool.

The exposed wood beams in the living space change pitch dramatically along the length of the room. This shifting of the beam slopes creates a sense of progressive movement and dynamism in the living space, allowing the architecture to animate a visual path from the reflecting pool to the sweeping view of Puget Sound. The roof’s architecture celebrates the visual diagonal path from the reflecting pool to Puget Sound.

Upstairs, the master bedroom cantilevers out toward the Puget Sound view. Tall glass walls wrap the bedroom on three sides, providing a panorama of water and mountains.

Modern craft is prevalent in the house. A waterjet-cut steel fence and gate lead to the house entry. Exterior siding is custom-milled red cedar. The steel and wood stairs have waterjetcut steel railings with a hand-drawn pattern. The beech interior cabinets have a CNC-milled pattern called “imaginary landscape.”

Beyond its natural beauty, the house was designed for high energy efficiency and is heavily insulated with a radiant hydronic heat system. Large glass areas with generous roof overhangs provide natural lighting and ventilation, making this the perfect design for Pacific Northwest living and climate.

For Additional Information
FINNE Architects: Nils Finne, Design Principal
Chris Hawley, Project Manager/Architect
Builder: SBI Construction

Photos: Benjamin Benschneider

MORGAN LUCAS

The HeART of the Home Cabinets by Trivonna

Cabinets by Trivonna of Lacey pride themselves on a design experience that is uniquely customized to their individual client’s dreams and wishes.

Trivonna brings to life an artful design plan built around their customer’s need and budget. We’ve all discovered that the ‘heart of the home’ isn’t just for the cook anymore. Often our kitchen plays host not only to baking and cooking, but to children’s and adult art, science and homework projects, and even dad’s auto repair, fishing and tackle shop.

“The kitchen has become a gathering place meant for entertaining guests and gathering family alike,” states owner Amber Bevacqua. “Our clients enjoy artful and thoughtful design built around the specific and functional needs for their space.”

Navigating the myriad of decisions on textiles and design options can be daunting. Trivonna has created a design studio offering a nurturing environment that helps clients realize their best kitchen design.

Whatever your kitchen design dream, creating a work of art and functional space built for you and your family is what Cabinets by Trivonna does beautifully. Be sure to visit their creative space and showroom in Lacey and meet Rick and Amber Bevacqua. They help make dream kitchens a reality.

Cabinets by Trivonna
4444 Lacey Blvd SE, Unit G, Lacey
360.539.5057
cabinetsbytrivonna.com

BY DANA PETHIA

Outdoor Living Spaces

It’s time to start thinking about your impending spring and summer garden parties. Outdoor living and entertaining are important to modern life; people enjoy spending time outside, surrounded by fresh air, wildlife and the sounds and smells of their environment. Ultimately, this means you need to offer your guests an outdoor space where they will feel comfortable spending time. If you haven’t given your outdoor spaces a second thought since fall, you might need some guidance toward up-and-coming trends. Here are some design ideas to jumpstart your creativity and get your outdoor areas ready for sunny skies.

Natural Materials

Metal and plastic outdoor furniture and features have been popular for decades because these materials offer the clean, modern lines essential to minimalism, and metal and plastic tend to withstand the elements fairly well. However, as interest in minimalism has waned, so has the use of synthetic or artificial materials in outdoor décor. Instead, you should look into utilizing natural materials, like organic cotton, wool, wood and wicker.

Warm Colors

In addition to the change in materials, the most up-to-date deck and patio furniture is warm and inviting in color. In recent history, color palettes for the home have been relatively cool-toned: grays, icy blues, white and black. Cool colors are refreshing and tend to have a calming effect, but they don’t often make a space feel welcoming or comfortable. As the new year dawns,
almost every designer is shifting focus toward warm and earthy hues, like brown, taupe, golden yellow, dusty red and olive green.

You can integrate warm colors many places in your exterior design, not just your outdoor furniture. You might consider giving your front and back doors a new coat of paint or changing the color of your home’s trim around windows and doors. You could add decorative hardscaping, like fences, with a new and inviting color palette. Finally, you can stain your concrete or repaint your deck to add color to your exterior. Most of these fixes are relatively small but pack a major decorative punch.

Functionality

It doesn’t matter how much time, effort and expense you put into your outdoor living area if your furniture is uncomfortable. Perhaps most important of all, the features you place in your exterior living spaces should be functional, meaning you and guests should be able to enjoy the stylish outdoors with ease and comfort.

Additionally, you might consider adding functional features to your outdoor living space, transforming it into a true room of your home. A popular choice is to add an outdoor kitchen space, replete with refrigerator, counter space, cooktop and more. An outdoor kitchen can be fun and interactive during warm-weather months, when you don’t want to separate the party between your yard and indoor kitchen. Plus, it gives you more opportunity to design your exterior, perhaps adding trendy countertops, backsplashes and lighting to the space.

BY MORGAN LUCAS

Getting Settled into a New Home

After the last box is moved into your new home, you might think the hardest part of moving is over. And you’re right, but there are still things to take care of before you can relax completely.

Get Your Utilities Set Up

You don’t want to arrive at your new place late at night and find that the lights don’t work. Before you move, arrange for the utilities to be set up there. Make sure all of your services are up and running so you can check your electronics and appliances.

Check Major Appliances

If you moved major appliances, such as a range, dishwasher, washer or dryer, check to make sure nothing was damaged during the move. This is particularly important if the mover prepared your appliances for the move. Your insurance policy may have a limited time in which to make a claim. Since these are big-ticket items, you want to make sure they’re all working.

Check all Boxes and Furniture

Make sure all boxes and furniture arrived and that nothing is damaged. If you’re missing something or you find damage, contact the mover and your insurance company to submit a claim. It’s important to do this immediately after moving in or the insurance company may not reimburse you.

Save Receipts

Keep all receipts and documentation related to your move in one file and store the file in a safe, secure place. Make sure you have your bill of lading and payment receipt. You may be able to claim your move on your next tax return, and you’ll need all the necessary receipts to make your claim.

Make Sure You’re Getting Your Mail

Check with the post office about mail forwarding. Update all important files and documents with your new address and notify everyone who needs to know about your move.

BY KELLY LENIHAN

Building Your Dream Home

Building your dream home can be exciting, but it can also be scary. Working with an architect that you trust and appreciate can make all the difference in keeping those fears in check.

Jennifer Weddermann, AIA, the owner of Weddermann Architecture, PLLC, in Tacoma shared a few tips with ShowCase Magazine recently on how to successfully navigate the process.

The first step she suggests may seem like the most obvious. Have a piece of land in mind. “No piece of land is truly flat, and no two sites are alike as far as access, neighbors, views, wind, or slope,” said Weddermann.

Before you buy the land or building, ask your architect to complete a feasibility study. Using online tools provided by cities and counties or even Google Earth, the study can determine setbacks, height limits, logical access, and even snow and wind load. According to Weddermann, “You’ll know up front if the land will work for your overall plan in terms of size and use.” Once the land is selected, your architect will work up a proposal for their scope of work. This is a good time to definitively determine the scale of your project, since this will translate into overall budget and architectural fees.

To communicate well during the design process, have visuals depicting what you like. At this early stage, it is important to think about the whole structure. The architect will need to know how you live and will come back with options for the layout.

Before permitting takes place, energy credits and materials should be considered as well as the selection of your general contractor. They can be a great resource for coordination with structural engineering and provide insight into products and techniques to save money.

Final steps include a thorough and critical review of the entire set of documents, a meeting with the general contractor to ensure you can afford the building before you submit for permits, and then periodic site visits by your architect.

“Your architect acts as a steward of your money throughout the building process,” added Weddermann.

For Additional Information
Weddermann Architecture
weddermann.com

LYNN CASTLE

TAPCO Credit Opens Gig Harbor Branch

Today, TAPCO Credit Union announced its continued expansion to Pierce County communities with the opening of its newest branch in the city of Gig Harbor scheduled for late February 2022. Located in the Pioneer Square retail complex at 7109 Pioneer Way, the opening represents the credit union’s sixth branch, coming on the heels of new locations that opened in Bonney Lake and Frederickson in the last couple of years.

A grand-opening celebration is scheduled at the branch April 22, 2022 at 2:00pm. To celebrate, TAPCO is offering a “Getaway” giveaway valued at $2,500. Washington residents, eighteen or older, can enter by visiting the Gig Harbor Branch February 22 – April 21, 2022. For official rules, please visit TAPCOcu.org/giveaway.

“Since 1934, TAPCO has been committed to improving the financial health of families and communities in Tacoma and Pierce County, and this is another big step forward in that mission,” said Justin Martin, Chief Executive Officer. “We’re excited to be extending a hand across the Narrows to the folks in Gig Harbor and the surrounding communities to continue that work.”

TAPCO’s new Gig Harbor branch will offer a full suite of financial services, including auto loans, mortgages and refinancing, savings and checking accounts, CDs and IRAs, among other services. The 2,300-square-foot space has undergone a complete redesign to make it more open and member-friendly, with an open concept, comfortable waiting area and remodeled personal banking stations.

The Gig Harbor location hours are Monday – Thursday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more visit www.TAPCOcu.org

8 Tips For Choosing A Kitchen Designer

Very few homeowners have the knowledge to design, build and install a new kitchen. That’s why many of us employ an expert kitchen designer. But how do you know if you are choosing the right kitchen designer to work with? It comes down to a bit of research and gut feelings. Design mistakes are costly, so it’s worth connecting with more than one kitchen designer to get a feel for the designer who is right for you. Consider the following eight tips when choosing a kitchen designer:

  1. Design ability and creativity
    How do you know just how good a given designer’s ability is? Check how long they have been designing kitchens. Ask to see some examples of their work. Will they be able to show you 3-D visuals of designs they create for you before going ahead with any work? Conceptual design can look amazing, but you want a designer with an eye for the practical realities of kitchen life too.
  2. Technical knowledge
    Your kitchen designer should have architectural drafting and construction experience. He or she needs to have a good knowledge of buildings and industry trends to bring you a state-ofthe-art kitchen design.
  3. Product knowledge
    Providing the right products and appliances for your kitchen also requires knowledge and skill. Good kitchen designers will know trusted cabinet makers and appliance firms to work with.
  4. Experience
    Everyone has to start somewhere, but for making such a big financial investment in your home, you want to choose a designer with experience. Ask to see examples of your kitchen designer’s work.
  5. The ability to understand client needs
    Be clear about all the aspects of kitchen design you want. The best kitchen designers will offer advice and support and guide you to achieve a kitchen design you are completely happy with. They will want to listen to all of your ideas and concerns. Your designer should be asking questions about your living space, your lifestyle, your cooking style and your kitchen needs. Always remember that you are the client, so you can set the terms.
  6. Communication skills
    Kitchen designers will need to communicate clearly with building contractors, electricians, plumbers and other professionals to get your job done on time and on budget.
  7. Testimonials
    A recommendation by friends or family is a good place to start, but don’t let that be the only factor informing your decision. Ask your preferred kitchen designer if you can speak with one of their previous clients. Check whether your designer kept to deadlines and responded promptly to any concerns.
  8. Qualifications and credentials
    Make sure your kitchen designer has the qualifications and credentials claimed. You want to know that your designer not only has an eye for great design, but that they’ve studied and understand construction, plumbing and electrical technologies. They should adhere to a professional code of conduct as well.

LEAH GROUT

Clear(ly) Connected Lake House Design

Imagine being one of the first to own property on Clear Lake outside of Graham, Washington. That was the story for one of the original homesteaders on the lake, and the extended family continues to have a deep love of the land and the lake. The homesteader’s grandson, a retired surgeon, sparkles and lights up when sharing his family’s connection to the lake.

The grandson’s Clear Lake home was built by Scott Jamison of Rainier Excavating and Nelson T. Miller, a retired Seattle architect. The contemporary lodgestyle home boasts two-story beamed ceilings with windows open to the lake and Mount Rainier views. It is warmed by a soaring two-story stone fireplace. The homeowner hand made the beams and mantle. The chandeliers next to the massive fireplace are of forged steel.

In 2015 the surgeon and his wife were introduced to Jamison’s childhood friend Juleen Pudists of Northlight Interiors. Northlight Interiors selected finishes, planned space, created the lodge-style fireplace, and provided cabinet and tile design throughout the home. Many of the home’s surfaces were handmade and locally sourced. These include indigenous stone, handmade tile, and local marble from a Pacific Northwest quarry. Wood and trim details were reclaimed from a Seattle mill.

The vision for this home was to seize the connection with Mount Rainier and Clear Lake right outside the windows. The genuine stone fireplace reflects the rocks along the shoreline. The kitchen’s white marble has veins of green and blue mimicking the colors of the lake. Brazilian cherry floors and cherry cabinetry add warmth to the modern architecture.

The homeowner boasts that Northlight Interiors made his kitchen perfect for his beloved wife, finding a space for a large pantry and detailing to fit their needs. The homeowners love to open their home to share with family and friends. It is bustling with lakeside activity throughout the warmer months.

EMILY HAPPY

To see more of the design for this house or for more information:
Northlight Interiors
houzz.com/projects/2409769
northlightinteriors.com