Team RED: Resourceful • Experienced • Dedicated

Results of a recent survey found that nearly one in four seniors felt they could not move, either because they couldn’t afford moving costs or because they didn’t believe they could sell their home. Local Keller Williams Realtor and founder of Team RED, Kathy Kleber, and her team of nine real estate agents have created a plan to tackle issues specifically facing transitioning seniors.

Team RED agents, an acronym for Resourceful, Experienced and Dedicated, offer special services to support seniors. They help with each step of the selling process from getting the senior connected with services in the community and locations for their next home to supporting them in any upgrades their property needs to maximize the selling price.

“Almost every senior specialist I know has come from a senior association, including me,” said Kleber recently. Nearly 20 years ago, Kleber and her parents were facing their own housing dilemma. Kleber’s dad’s health was failing but her mom was very active and social. A move to Wesley Homes, a United Methodist Community for active senior living in Des Moines, became their home. Kleber’s father passed a year or so after the move, but her mom lives there to this day where she is active, travels and serves on the board of everything.

“That experience taught me to understand the journey and love on seniors as they work through this time in their lives,” she said. “And, it became my heart’s work,” she added. Team RED is a family affair with her husband, Kirk Kleber, a founding member, and daughter, Ellisa Greer, as part of the team. Greer’s background in geriatric nursing is a huge benefit to the Team RED organization. Plus, her service in the Army and that of her Dad, Kirk, in the Navy, adds to their concierge-level service for all veterans.

The biggest difference in Team RED’s approach is to get the seniors moved and settled first. According to Kleber, “We always start with the person — where are you going and what are you taking with you?” Once that is settled, then a project manager steps in to oversee necessary renovations by one of their three sets of general contracting teams. Then it is time to stage the home and implement a successful sale.

“Serving with heart, homes for all life’s seasons,” remains Kleber’s motto.

For Additional Information
Team RED
bit.ly/3EZLce3
253.449.8088

LYNN CASTLE

How To Incorporate Biophilic Design into Your Home

Biophilic design is not just about bringing the outdoors in; the focus is on indoor air quality, natural light, and color schemes grounded in nature.

Indoor Air Quality

Be mindful of the items you bring into your home such as harsh chemical cleaners, scented candles, and other toxic chemicals. Open windows and let the fresh air and sound of nature find the way into your home and your mind. Clear out clutter and change your air filters on a regular basis.

Add Live Plants

They increase oxygen and purify the air and improve your indoor air quality. You want to select plants that are a good fit for the level of care you can provide. If you have pets, make sure you are selecting plants that will not harm them or small children if that is a concern.

If you do not have a green thumb, faux plants may seem like an obvious choice, but they do not provide the same effect. The main disadvantage of fake plants is that they have no health benefits and most are made from synthetic plastic which actually adds the toxins in your air.

Maximize Natural Light

Natural light in a home is always better than artificial light. It bathes your room in a rich full-spectrum hue that light bulbs can only hope to duplicate, and it increases your body’s feel-good serotonin levels. But if you do not have natural light, you can use natural light bulbs providing high-quality light, no eye strain, better focus, and a happier mood. If you work from home, they can enhance productivity.

Incorporate Colors Found in Nature

Most people think of the dark green of leaves, the warm orange of the sunset, and the earthy brown of the mud. But colors do not need to be rustic to be grounded in nature; layers of whites and cream can also feel very tranquil and work well when used as a base. You can add high-contrast neutrals for a more dramatic color scheme. Greens, browns, and grays work well also because they lend a warm cozy feel to your interior environment. We recommend choosing three colors and repeating them throughout. This creates continuity and the combination of almost any three colors will work. You can also add natural materials, shapes found in nature, and large-scale art.

For Additional Information
Alinda Morris Interior Design
Instagram: @alindamorris

Designed to Maximize Sweeping Views

The Elliott Bay House is located in Seattle on a narrow site facing Puget Sound. The house has a south-facing courtyard containing a reflecting pool with two “floating” basalt boulders. In the yard, the reflecting pool gathers all the roof drainage from the house and the living room roof downspout, providing a 10-foot dramatic waterfall. The living space has been designed around sweeping westerly views of Puget Sound. By contrast, the east side of the space is an intimate courtyard with a reflecting pool.

The exposed wood beams in the living space change pitch dramatically along the length of the room. This shifting of the beam slopes creates a sense of progressive movement and dynamism in the living space, allowing the architecture to animate a visual path from the reflecting pool to the sweeping view of Puget Sound. The roof’s architecture celebrates the visual diagonal path from the reflecting pool to Puget Sound.

Upstairs, the master bedroom cantilevers out toward the Puget Sound view. Tall glass walls wrap the bedroom on three sides, providing a panorama of water and mountains.

Modern craft is prevalent in the house. A waterjet-cut steel fence and gate lead to the house entry. Exterior siding is custom-milled red cedar. The steel and wood stairs have waterjetcut steel railings with a hand-drawn pattern. The beech interior cabinets have a CNC-milled pattern called “imaginary landscape.”

Beyond its natural beauty, the house was designed for high energy efficiency and is heavily insulated with a radiant hydronic heat system. Large glass areas with generous roof overhangs provide natural lighting and ventilation, making this the perfect design for Pacific Northwest living and climate.

For Additional Information
FINNE Architects: Nils Finne, Design Principal
Chris Hawley, Project Manager/Architect
Builder: SBI Construction

Photos: Benjamin Benschneider

MORGAN LUCAS

Making Your House a Home

Tips to transform a house into a home with decor and furniture from the heart

Your entry is the initial introduction to your home and sets the stage for you and your guests. Place a cozy rug or floor mat inside the door to define the entry and give an immediate sense of personality. A reclaimed wood bench, umbrella stand or coat rack, and luscious candles complete the welcoming picture.

Be creative with your space. Move items at an angle, layer different rugs, and add a wall of photos and memories. Use your imagination to make the space warm, inviting and as unique as you are.

Try to bring nature inside. Although the Northwest is overflowing with the beauty of nature, we all know that during our wet, gloomy weather we may stay inside for much of the time. Visit your local nursery to get tips on what kind of plants will work for your space, the amount of light available, and your lifestyle.

Incorporate different elements such as wood, metal, glass and greenery throughout each room to bring warmth and life to your spaces. Mirrors not only provide style and function but also lighten up a room and help create movement.