Designed to Maximize Sweeping Views

The Elliott Bay House is located in Seattle on a narrow site facing Puget Sound. The house has a south-facing courtyard containing a reflecting pool with two “floating” basalt boulders. In the yard, the reflecting pool gathers all the roof drainage from the house and the living room roof downspout, providing a 10-foot dramatic waterfall. The living space has been designed around sweeping westerly views of Puget Sound. By contrast, the east side of the space is an intimate courtyard with a reflecting pool.

The exposed wood beams in the living space change pitch dramatically along the length of the room. This shifting of the beam slopes creates a sense of progressive movement and dynamism in the living space, allowing the architecture to animate a visual path from the reflecting pool to the sweeping view of Puget Sound. The roof’s architecture celebrates the visual diagonal path from the reflecting pool to Puget Sound.

Upstairs, the master bedroom cantilevers out toward the Puget Sound view. Tall glass walls wrap the bedroom on three sides, providing a panorama of water and mountains.

Modern craft is prevalent in the house. A waterjet-cut steel fence and gate lead to the house entry. Exterior siding is custom-milled red cedar. The steel and wood stairs have waterjetcut steel railings with a hand-drawn pattern. The beech interior cabinets have a CNC-milled pattern called “imaginary landscape.”

Beyond its natural beauty, the house was designed for high energy efficiency and is heavily insulated with a radiant hydronic heat system. Large glass areas with generous roof overhangs provide natural lighting and ventilation, making this the perfect design for Pacific Northwest living and climate.

For Additional Information
FINNE Architects: Nils Finne, Design Principal
Chris Hawley, Project Manager/Architect
Builder: SBI Construction

Photos: Benjamin Benschneider

MORGAN LUCAS

Getting Settled into a New Home

After the last box is moved into your new home, you might think the hardest part of moving is over. And you’re right, but there are still things to take care of before you can relax completely.

Get Your Utilities Set Up

You don’t want to arrive at your new place late at night and find that the lights don’t work. Before you move, arrange for the utilities to be set up there. Make sure all of your services are up and running so you can check your electronics and appliances.

Check Major Appliances

If you moved major appliances, such as a range, dishwasher, washer or dryer, check to make sure nothing was damaged during the move. This is particularly important if the mover prepared your appliances for the move. Your insurance policy may have a limited time in which to make a claim. Since these are big-ticket items, you want to make sure they’re all working.

Check all Boxes and Furniture

Make sure all boxes and furniture arrived and that nothing is damaged. If you’re missing something or you find damage, contact the mover and your insurance company to submit a claim. It’s important to do this immediately after moving in or the insurance company may not reimburse you.

Save Receipts

Keep all receipts and documentation related to your move in one file and store the file in a safe, secure place. Make sure you have your bill of lading and payment receipt. You may be able to claim your move on your next tax return, and you’ll need all the necessary receipts to make your claim.

Make Sure You’re Getting Your Mail

Check with the post office about mail forwarding. Update all important files and documents with your new address and notify everyone who needs to know about your move.

BY KELLY LENIHAN

Building Your Dream Home

Building your dream home can be exciting, but it can also be scary. Working with an architect that you trust and appreciate can make all the difference in keeping those fears in check.

Jennifer Weddermann, AIA, the owner of Weddermann Architecture, PLLC, in Tacoma shared a few tips with ShowCase Magazine recently on how to successfully navigate the process.

The first step she suggests may seem like the most obvious. Have a piece of land in mind. “No piece of land is truly flat, and no two sites are alike as far as access, neighbors, views, wind, or slope,” said Weddermann.

Before you buy the land or building, ask your architect to complete a feasibility study. Using online tools provided by cities and counties or even Google Earth, the study can determine setbacks, height limits, logical access, and even snow and wind load. According to Weddermann, “You’ll know up front if the land will work for your overall plan in terms of size and use.” Once the land is selected, your architect will work up a proposal for their scope of work. This is a good time to definitively determine the scale of your project, since this will translate into overall budget and architectural fees.

To communicate well during the design process, have visuals depicting what you like. At this early stage, it is important to think about the whole structure. The architect will need to know how you live and will come back with options for the layout.

Before permitting takes place, energy credits and materials should be considered as well as the selection of your general contractor. They can be a great resource for coordination with structural engineering and provide insight into products and techniques to save money.

Final steps include a thorough and critical review of the entire set of documents, a meeting with the general contractor to ensure you can afford the building before you submit for permits, and then periodic site visits by your architect.

“Your architect acts as a steward of your money throughout the building process,” added Weddermann.

For Additional Information
Weddermann Architecture
weddermann.com

LYNN CASTLE

Exercise Your Green Thumb all year long

Drizzly days that accompany the Pacific Northwest seasonality can take a toll on us. It is important to find ways to stay active and keep your spirits high. Gardening creates a sense of purpose and is a very rewarding activity because it allows people to experience success, build confidence, and connect with their physical environment. It’s very satisfying for seniors with dementia to nurture plants and it’s an activity that people feel naturally connected to.

Transitioning your gardens and raised beds from summer to fall is a great way to keep enjoying the outdoors and keep up your gardening all year long.

Many vegetables thrive in colder months and are also a great way to spruce up your cooking! A few greens that you can enjoy in the fall are spinach, lettuce, and kale.  Don’t forget your favorite root crops such as carrots, beets, onions and radishes.

The beginning of autumn is also an optimal time to begin harvesting herbs like rosemary, basil and sage, which actually develop their strongest flavor before blooming. You can snip them early in the morning and store them somewhere dry. What could be better on a cold afternoon than a warm bowl of soup garnished with fresh herbs from your garden?

If your passion for gardening is fueled by flowers, there are some beautiful annuals that can make your garden come alive with fall color as well. Some good fall annuals include pansies, verbena, and mums, which are great for borders, mass plantings, and containers.

The two most important steps you can take to help make sure your garden and planters are ready for the colder months ahead are:

  1. Add some mulch

Mulching late in the season can block weeds, keep in moisture, and insulate the soil. Mulch also prolongs the growing season, which will allow your garden to prosper. Another tip to remember is that leaves are a great substitute for mulch and can offer the same benefits. They add nutrients and soil as they breakdown. 

  1. Clean up and prune

It is important to trim and check spent plants for pests and diseases. If you do not see any sign of mildew or fungus on existing plants, you can even bury them and let them continue to act as mulch. by Angela Byrge