Terms of Endearment at Tacoma Little Theatre

Tacoma Little Theatre begins its 103rd Season, “The Start of Something New”, with Terms of Endearment, adapted by Dan Gordon and based on the book by Pulitzer Prize-winner Larry McMurtry and James L. Brooks’s screenplay of the Oscar-winning film. Terms of Endearment is directed by Blake R. York (The Pillowman).   

Though Emma is often exasperated by her highly-opinionated mother, Aurora, they talk every day about their problems, from Aurora finding unexpected love even as she becomes a reluctant grandmother, to Emma’s struggle in her troubled marriage. But when they need one another most, will they be able to find courage in each other? This funny and touching story captures the delicate, sometimes fractured bonds between mothers and daughters, husbands and wives, and lovers, both old and new.

Tacoma Little Theatre’s production of Terms of Endearment features Stephanie Leeper as Aurora, Anastazja Quinn as Emma, Scott C. Brown as Garrett, Derek Mesford as Flap, Danielle Locken as Patsy/Doris/Nurse, and Jay Lurvey as Dr. Maise. 

Terms of Endearment will run Friday, September 10, through Sunday, September 26, 2021.  Friday and Saturday showings are at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2:00pm.  Terms of Endearment is recommended for ages 12 and up.  

Tickets available and information for the full COVID-19 protocols please visit www.tacomalittletheatre.com/covid.

There will be a special “Pay What You Can” performance on Thursday, September 23, 2021.  Tickets for that performance are only available in person or over the phone.

Nathalie Bajinya’s Future Is Bright

Nathalie Bajinya has been fascinated by textiles and fashion design from a very early age. She once cut up her mother’s dress to fashion into her own clothing designs at age four.

Originally from the Congo and orphaned at a young age, Bajinya learned to sew while living in an orphanage in Kenya. Excelling at the craft, fashion design quickly became a lifelong passion.

Today, under the label Undeniable Bajinya, Bajinya translates her sewing and design skills into exquisite one-of-a-kind garments and accessories in her Lakewood shop, Undeniable Bajinya.

Home to couture gowns, wedding dresses, and custom-tailored fashions, Undeniable Bajinya’s signature designs are vibrant cotton and wool dresses and jackets that combine French fashion with African colors and American styles.

A rare talent, Bajinya can look at a swath of fabric and intuitively know what design will best highlight the fabric’s motif or drape. “When I look at fabric I see something that is telling a story,” says Nathalie.

Often made with distinctively colorful and elaborately designed African wax print fabric – commonly referred to as the “wax hollandais,” “ankara,” or “kitenge” – Undeniable Bajinya’s unique designs encompass innovation, artistic creativity and the consumer’s choice to celebrate life through their clothing.

Recently featured on King 5 Evening, the segment thoughtfully shared Nathalie Bajinya’s journey, showcasing her love of fabric and her passion to design and sew beautiful garments.

In May, with only two weeks to prepare, Undeniable Bajinya featured twelve of her original designs during Africa Fashion Week Seattle in Redmond, Washington.

Without patterns, Bajinya designs, sketches, and crafts each of her beautifully unique fashions from customers’ measurements. She says there is nothing like a dress made exactly to your measurements.

“Back in my country, you don’t buy a dress from a store, you go to a tailor,” Bajinya said. “We don’t have that here in
America. Everyone should have access to custom garments that fit perfectly, not just famous people.”

For Additional Information
Undeniable Bajinya
6405A Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Lakewood
undeniablebajinya.com

KELLY LENIHAN

Imagine Van Gogh: Coming to the Tacoma Armory

In 2008, Annabelle Mauger crafted her very first immersive Van Gogh exhibition and, in the last few years, the finalized project has become an incredible hit. Imagine Van Gogh, the Original Exhibition in Image Totale© sold over 500,000 tickets across Canada in 2020 alone. The exhibit will be presenting stunning renditions of Van Gogh’s classic artwork in over 200 of his paintings brought to life in a breathtaking immersive experience. Mauger and Julien Baron, renowned for their work at Cathédrale d’Images in Les Baux-de-Provence, France, are no strangers to the immersive art world — in fact, they are pioneers of the medium. Since 2016, the duo have developed and expanded Image Totale© to create a truly emotionally cathartic experience for visitors.

In order to create such a unique exhibition, Mauger and Baron used warping techniques to adapt the surface to the projected image, releasing the art being trapped inside of the canvas. “The choice of images, the way they are positioned, their rhythm and their association with the music all compose this original creation conceived by Annabelle Mauger and developed with Julien Baron.”

Online reservations for Imagine Van Gogh are encouraged, as admission is based on timed-entry and tickets are sure to sell out quickly! Each ticket is valid for one person, with no re-entry permitted and they are nonrefundable. The exhibition is open at the Tacoma Armory from December 18, 2021 to January 30, 2022, with shortened hours on Christmas Eve and Christmas.

For Additional Information and Tickets
tacomaartslive.org

MARTINA PRESTON

Scholarship awarded to Dance Theater NW Dancer

When she first started dancing, University Place’s Emma Young was just that, young.  Now, at age 18 and an honors graduate from both Curtis High School and Tacoma Community College, Emma has her sights set on Butler University’s prestigious dance program.

With a $20,000 a year renewing scholarship, Butler University in Indiana recognized the talent in Emma just as Melanie Kirk-Stauffer, Artistic Director of Dance Theater Northwest did nearly ten years ago.  According to Kirk-Stauffer, “I remember noticing how special Emma was when she was very young.  She came to the company warm up for a performance with a mature attitude, ready to work.  It didn’t seem to faze her that she was years younger and much smaller than the other dancers in the ensemble.”

Maybe when her mom, Paula Young, started her in dance classes at age 5 it was just something to keep her busy.  But that interest soon turned into passion.  When asked about her love of dance, Emma said “It’s hard to explain, but if things in my life get crazy, dance is always there.”  She added, “it is a constant in my life.”

As the oldest of three, Emma also taught youth classes at Dance Theater NW earning her Teaching Certification in 2019. Throughout her young life, Emma was the recipient of numerous ballet scholarships including several to the Joffrey ballet school in New York where she attended intense week-long programs.  Locally, Emma danced several leading roles including three seasons as Clara in the Nutcracker. 

During the four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts Program at Butler, Emma will study ballet but also modern dance.  “I’m excited to keep dancing … and for a change of environment for my dancing,” Emma said. Emma aspires to dance with a company following her time at Butler.

Dance Theater NW is a 501c-3 non-profit that was founded in University Place, WA in 1987 with a mission to encourage and support young artists and everyone who has a passion for dance from age 4 to age 80.  To learn more about Dance Theater NW you can visit their website:  DTNW.org

Oldest Working Nurse in America Hangs Up Her Scrubs After 70 Years

More than 70 years after her career began, 96-year-old Florence “SeeSee” Rigney, the oldest working nurse in America, is retiring, MultiCare Health System announced today.  Her last day was Friday, July 16, 2021.

“I don’t like to sit around – I’ve always got to have something to do. That’s my nature,” Rigney’s said. “I don’t know exactly what made me want to become a nurse, but it was something that I always wanted to do. I love to interact with patients and give them the help that I can.”

In her retirement, she’s looking forward to enjoying her family and friends. Rigney’s witnessed countless changes and medical innovations since she first put on the white uniform of a student nurse in the Tacoma General School of Nursing. And her legacy will live on to inspire the next generation of nurses.

In appreciation for her service to the nursing profession, MultiCare Health System is establishing the SeeSee Rigney Nursing Endowed Scholarship Fund, which will provide scholarships to MultiCare nurses for continued learning and development and for MultiCare employees who would like to pursue a career in nursing.

“Even working into her nineties, SeeSee has never been one to slow down. Some of her colleagues joked that they had to sprint to keep up with her,” said Laureen Driscoll, president of MultiCare Tacoma General and Allenmore Hospitals. “She’s continued to be a dedicated nurse and an incredible resource to her colleagues and community. It’s humbling to stop and think about the thousands and thousands of lives she’s cared for. Everyone at MultiCare thanks SeeSee for her unmatched dedication and service, and we’re proud to honor her by supporting tomorrow’s future nurses.”

Her career has taken her across the country, from Washington to Texas to Wyoming, with small breaks to care for her family. Rigney has two children.  As an operating room nurse, Rigney was responsible setting up operating rooms to the specifications of surgeons and prepping patients for surgery, such as positioning them on the operating table. During her shifts, she was always active, frequently walking more than three miles or more according to her Fitbit. And she was always the first to jump to a task. When and pregnant nurse made a call to hospital nurses to help her move a patient, Rigney, in her nineties, was the first to show up.

Rigney did try to slow down once. When she was 65, she turned in her retirement papers. But that only lasted for about six months. She knew she needed to get back in action to stay sharp and active. She came back to Tacoma General to work full time and only within the last couple years switched to part time, continuing to prep surgery rooms and patients, part time. She worked again as an operating room nurse, preparing rooms for surgery and filling in as a relief nurse.

When Rigney started nursing, penicillin had just been introduced. One of the biggest changes in medicine that she’s seen is the duration of patient stays. In the old days, she said, patients could stay for 10 days or longer after surgery. Now most go home in a day or two, thanks to advances in modern medicine and in-home care options.

In a career spanning 70 years, you pick up quite a bit of knowledge and Rigney has some to share with future nurses.

“Don’t ever think that you know it all,” she said. “I kind of did that when I was in the operating room and you have to always be open. You never stop learning.”

6 Tips for Winning Over Picky Toddlers

Getting young children to eat a balanced, healthy diet can be a definite challenge. But it’s important to remember that as you help your child learn healthy eating habits for life, the foundation of healthy eating outweighs the challenges by far. Nonetheless, it can still be a difficult phase, so here are some ways
to ease you through this trying season.

1. Minimize mealtime distractions.

Turn off the television, clear toys from the dining table, and implement a “no phone at the table” rule to help everyone focus on the family conversation and their food.

2. Set a good example.

Eat together as a family as often as possible and eat a variety of healthy foods yourself. You are your child’s best role model; let them see you enjoying healthy foods and they will follow.

3. Don’t force your child to clean their plate.

Instead, avoid the power struggle by encouraging them to try at least two bites of everything on their plate.

4. Think about how you brand it.

Food becomes more approachable with a fun name attached to it. Think “pinwheel sandwiches” rather than turkey and cheese rolled up in a tortilla, “pink fish” rather than salmon, or “miniature trees” rather than broccoli.

5. Get your child involved.

Encourage them to help you shop for healthy food at the grocery store, then let them help wash and prepare the fruits and vegetables. Being a part of the process makes kids more interested in the end result on their plate.

6. Let your child have a say by giving them choices with limited options.

Ask questions like: Milk or water with dinner? Purple cup or green cup? Superhero plate or Mickey Mouse plate? This keeps your child feeling like their input matters while also keeping the conversation focused.

Pediatrics Northwest
pedsnw.net

Celebrating 40 Years: Family Eyecare Assoc.

How you treat your customers sets you apart from others in your field. Dr. Spencer Garlick and his Family EyeCare Associates practice embraces that philosophy with his motto Do What is Best for Your Patient.

“When you treat people, including your staff, like family, you can’t help having success,” said Dr. Spencer Garlick, owner of Family EyeCare Associates in Fircrest.

Celebrating 40 years in business, Family EyeCare Associates was started in 1981 by Dr. Erick Hartman. While Dr. Hartman retired in 2016, he still fills in to stay connected with old friends and perform a service he loves.

Specializing in low vision cases, or persons legally blind but with some range of sight, brought Dr. Hartman and Dr. Garlick together in 2013. With the same specialization and more importantly, the same vision for quality eye care through caring customer service and a family friendly atmosphere, the two Doctors of Optometry created a succession plan to keep the practice in place.

A new logo for the practice was introduced this year to celebrate the 40 year anniversary. Designed by a patient, the logo features the nearby Tacoma Narrows Bridge. According to Dr. Garlick, “The logo exemplifies a bridge to future success as well as the communities we serve.”

The pandemic year of 2020 was supposed to be a great year for eyes, but that didn’t work out so well. So, in an attempt to capture some of the special significance, Dr. Garlick discovered some inadvertent hidden meaning in his new logo. A careful inspection shows the bridge has the Roman numeral XX over XX. That also adds up to 40, symbolic of the practice’s 40th year. Clearly, he was happy with his new logo design. It also goes perfectly with the last four digits of their phone number: 2020.

The entire team at Family EyeCare Associates cares about vision and eye health, stressing the importance of annual comprehensive exams. The clinic provides the full scope of optometry services as well glasses, contacts, and medical
eye exams.

Family Eyecare Associates
6314 19th Street West, Suite 1, Fircrest
familyeyecare2020.net

BY LYNN CASTLE

APCC: On a Mission for the Community

When Asia Pacific Cultural Center (APCC) was formed in 1996, it was intended to fulfill a deep need as a place that brought together significant segments of minority Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander heritage. For more than two decades, APCC has taught and celebrated the cultural history, customs, arts, crafts, people and legends from their 47 represented nations. And it has been a hub for so many people to gather and celebrate. To be entertained. To show their pride. And to help each other.

Helping each other is one of the major missions of APCC. And, help they do. Whether it is assistance in filling out government forms to start a new business or guiding members in understanding complicated regulations, APCC is there to help. The organization knows they are trusted because they look like their members and speak their language. They form a comfort zone and have the capacity and earned trust to improve their members’ lives.

Through phenomenal support from their sponsors, APCC puts on a vast number of annual events that entertain and educate. But APCC also sees a need to help with students creating many wrap-around youth programs in the local schools. Reducing stress for youth begins and ends with reducing stress on their parents. This is accomplished by APCC through housing and food assistance, two of the biggest stressful issues for any family.

As APCC approaches its 25th anniversary in November, it has expanded its role in the community by offering free testing and vaccinations, much needed food boxes and school supplies plus Resiliency Grants Assistance for small businesses. Asia Pacific Cultural Center – on a continued mission of service.

Asia Pacific Cultural Center
4851 S. Tacoma Way, Tacoma
253.383.3900
APCC96.org

BY LYNN CASTLE

Health Starts Where We Live, Work and Play

Healthy choices should be convenient choices for everyone in Western Washington. That’s why Pierce County medical providers are helping families live healthier lives, through programs and services in medical clinics and hospitals throughout our communities.

Tacoma health care quality comes down to access, affordability and outcomes. Out of 39 counties in Washington, Pierce County ranks 24 for health outcomes, 26 for health factors, and 33 for healthy behaviors. Research indicates that a healthy lifestyle may prevent up to 70 percent of common life-threatening diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes.

Since 2005, Pierce County Gets Fit & Healthy, a countywide initiative to promote the importance of healthy eating and active living, has provided tools to help everyone get fit and healthy. It is a major collaborative effort, led by the MultiCare Center for Healthy Living, the YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap Counties, and the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department. Best of all, it’s easy to participate. Whatever your health challenge, whatever your fitness goals, Pierce County Gets Fit & Healthy has something for you.

Sure, healthy living is a long-term commitment, but there are steps you can take right now that will make you healthier today than yesterday and pave the way for healthy living tomorrow. Since Pierce County has 50 park sites totaling over 4,200 acres, why not find a walking buddy and get out on one of many walking trails right away? Not sure where to start? Check out this handy walking guide for beginners.

Health Care Resources

  • YMCA
  • Hospitals
  • Medical Clinics
  • Emergency Services
  • Senior Centers/Resources
  • Caregiver Support
  • Parent Help 123
  • Maternal Child Outreach
  • Community Health Care
  • Children With Special Health Care Needs
  • Tacoma/Pierce County Health Department

BY KELLY LENIHAN

The Harbor History Museum

Nestled on the Gig Harbor waterfront where Donkey Creek meets the bay, the Harbor History Museum is celebrating its 11th year of operation. Yet the Museum’s campus has a much deeper history, first as a village site of the sxw babš, or Swift Water People, a band of the Puyallup Tribe, and later the site of Austin’s log mill and original site of the Peninsula Light Company. The Museum campus includes the 1893 Midway Schoolhouse and 65-foot fishing boat, Shenandoah. Step through the Museum’s front doors, surrounded by massive logs reminiscent of the trees that were once milled here, and a whole world of culture and tradition welcomes you.

The Museum’s 7,000 square-foot permanent gallery takes you on a journey from the twisted remnants of “Galloping Gertie” (the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge) to the immigrant stories of boat builders, fishermen, farmers, and ferry operators. Look closely and find the first winners of Gig Harbor’s fabled Round Rock Contest and hear the clamor of the crowd as C.E. Shaw’s famous racing roosters take to the track. These roosters were so well known they were invited to Madison Square Garden in New York in 1936.

Fans of local boat building will delight in the Willits canoe, the giant wheel from the ferry Defiance, and a purse seiner’s power block—the 1950s invention that changed commercial fishing forever. Loved by many are the Norwegian and Croatian costumes on display from the days of Scandia Gaard, a 1970s local attraction where Nordic heritage was celebrated through music, dance, and folklore.

Visitors may step inside the one-room schoolhouse, the last of its kind in the Gig Harbor area. Restored and set in 1915, the schoolhouse is home to the popular Pioneer School Experience field trip program.

The Shenandoah is 65 feet of wonder. Recently named an American Treasure by the National Park Service, she is being preserved for future generations as the centerpiece of the Museum’s new Maritime Gallery, due to open in 2025. Visitors can see her restoration in action.

Harbor History Museum
4121 Harborview Dr, Gig Harbor
235.858.6722
harborhistorymuseum.org

BY STEPHANIE LILE